30-10-13

U.S. spying: Is PRISM just the tip of the iceberg?

Oct 30 2013

Report: The NSA is spying on data from Google and Yahoo, too

New docs show NSA taps Google, Yahoo data center links

Tapping overseas cables grabs more data than the PRISM court-approved process.

US intelligence access to the mounds of data held by Google and Yahoo goes far beyond the court-approved PRISM program, which was described in some of the first National Security Agency (NSA) leaks to come out this summer. Top secret documents published today by The Washington Post reveal that the NSA has tapped into overseas links that Google and Yahoo use to communicate between their data centers.

The newly revealed program, codenamed MUSCULAR, harvests vast amounts of data. A top-secret memo dated January 9, 2013 says that the NSA gathered 181,280,466 new records in the previous 30 days. Those records include both metadata and the actual content of communications: text, audio, and video.

The program is a strikingly aggressive one on the part of the NSA against US-based Internet companies. Operating overseas gives the NSA more lax rules to follow than what governs its behavior stateside.

In one of the documents (a hand-drawn sheet), an NSA presenter explains how the agency gets in to the mid-point where the "Google Cloud" touches the "public Internet." With a smiley-face drawing added, the slide explains: "SSL Added and removed here!"

The MUSCULAR program taps directly into the fiber optic cables that Google and Yahoo use to transmit data between their own data centers—a situation the companies have tried to avoid, in part by purchasing or leasing thousands of miles of their own fiber optic cables, explains the Post. The program is conducted overseas in conjunction with GCHQ, the UK's top intelligence agency.

Google has already said the company is moving swiftly to further encrypt the flow of information between its data centers as a reaction to government snooping. It spoke to the Post about that process in a separate story, published on September 6.

Under the PRISM program, Internet companies like Google and Yahoo are compelled to put data for certain users in a kind of digital lock-box for government use through a process overseen by courts.

The MUSCULAR program revealed today apparently takes place without the companies' knowledge. Google told the Post that it is "troubled by allegations of government intercepting traffic between our data centers, and we are not aware of this activity."

Yahoo emphasized that it has "strict controls in place to protect the security of our data centers, and we have not given access to our data centers to the NSA or any other government agency."

Neither the White House nor the office that oversees the NSA said anything about the program to the Post. They would not confirm or deny its existence.

The newly published documents are part of the massive trove of information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden to journalists at the Post and The Guardian.

The Post contacted two engineers close to Google about the slides, and the paper describes how they "exploded in profanity" upon viewing the smiley-face slide—an apparent celebration of government conquest over Google's security. "I hope you publish this," one source said.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/10/new-docs-show-nsa-taps-google-yahoo-data-center-links/

U.S. spying: action against newspapers

British Prime Minister David Cameron

October 28, 2013

UK PM threatens to act against papers over Snowden leaks

British Prime Minister David Cameron has indicated that the government may take action against newspapers which publish “damaging” intelligence leaks from American whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Speaking in the House of Commons on Monday, Cameron suggested that the UK government could impose court injunctions on papers or use D-notices in order to prevent the publication of documents revealing US espionage activities. 

He also said it would be very difficult for the government to “stand back” if the press did not show enough restraint on reporting the US National Security Agency (NSA) leaked files. 

"If they (newspapers) don't demonstrate some social responsibility it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act," Cameron told MPs.

Moreover, the British premier said the daily Guardian had "gone on" to print “damaging” data following an initial agreement to destroy other sensitive material. 

Cameron’s remarks came in reply to a question from Conservative MP Julian Smith on reports that secrets leaked by former CIA employee have hampered the work of Britain's intelligence agencies. 

Earlier in June, Snowden leaked two top secret US government spying programs, under which the NSA and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are eavesdropping on millions of American and European phone records and the Internet data from major Internet companies such as Facebook, Yahoo, Google, Apple, and Microsoft. 

The US intelligence whistleblower also admitted his role in the leaks in a 12-minute video recorded interview published by the Guardian. 

A month later, the paper reported that it had been forced by authorities in Britain to destroy the classified documents it received from former NSA contractor. 

Earlier this month, Cameron said the NSA files, leaked by Snowden to the newspaper, have damaged the UK's national security. 

Speaking during prime minister's questions in the House of Commons, he also urged MPs to investigate whether the paper has broken the law by publishing the classified documents. 

SSM/HE

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2013/10/28/331820/uk-pm-warns-papers-over-snowden-leaks/

Photo: British Prime Minister David Cameron

http://www.pressfreedom.eu/en/index.php

http://www.phonearena.com/news/International-spying-British-intelligence-has-had-access-to-PRISM-since-2010_id43801

U.S. Spying: U.N. General Assembly

The electronic surveillance of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (left, pictured with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon) reportedly goes back to 2002, even before she was elected to office. Credit: UN Photo/Mark Garten

UNITED NATIONS, Oct 28 2013 (IPS)

When the 193-member General Assembly adopts a resolution next month censuring the illegal electronic surveillance of governments and world leaders by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), the U.N.’s highest policy-making body will spare the United States from public condemnation despite its culpability in widespread wiretapping.

A draft resolution currently in limited circulation – a copy of which was obtained by IPS – criticises “the conduct of extra-territorial surveillance” and the “interception of communications in foreign jurisdictions”.

But it refuses to single out the NSA or the United States, which stands accused of spying on foreign governments, including political leaders in Germany, France, Brazil, Spain and Mexico, among some 30 others.

http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/10/u-n-will-censure-illegal-spying-but-not-u-s/

Photo: The electronic surveillance of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (left, pictured with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon) reportedly goes back to 2002, even before she was elected to office. Credit: UN Photo/Mark Garten